Hazard Communication - General

Hazard Communication - General$20.00 USDAbout 32 million workers are potentially exposed to one or more chemical hazards. There are an estimated 575,000 existing chemical products, and hundreds of new ones being introduced each year. Exposure to chemicals poses a serious problem for many workers. Chemical exposure may cause or contribute to many serious health effects such as heart ailments, kidney and lung damage, sterility, cancer, burns, and rashes. Some chemicals may also be safety hazards and have the potential to cause fires and explosions and other serious accidents.  Because of the seriousness of these problems, and because many people know little or nothing about them, Congress passed The Right-To-Know law. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) subsequently developed the Hazard Communication standard to establish uniform requirements for informing employees about hazards related to workplace chemicals.  The Hazard Communication standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) ensures that the hazards of all chemicals produced are evaluated, and that information concerning these hazards is transmitted to employers and employees. Under the provisions of this standard each employee exposed to hazardous chemicals must receive information about those chemicals through a comprehensive hazard communication program which includes identification of chemical hazards, chemical labeling, and material safety data sheets in the training program.
Array
$20.00

QUANTITY DISCOUNTS

1-10
$20.00
11-25 $18.00
26-50 $17.00
51-75 $16.00
76-100 $15.00
101-UP $10.00

Description

Hazard Communication - General

$20.00 USD

About 32 million workers are potentially exposed to one or more chemical hazards. There are an estimated 575,000 existing chemical products, and hundreds of new ones being introduced each year. Exposure to chemicals poses a serious problem for many workers. Chemical exposure may cause or contribute to many serious health effects such as heart ailments, kidney and lung damage, sterility, cancer, burns, and rashes. Some chemicals may also be safety hazards and have the potential to cause fires and explosions and other serious accidents.  Because of the seriousness of these problems, and because many people know little or nothing about them, Congress passed The Right-To-Know law. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) subsequently developed the Hazard Communication standard to establish uniform requirements for informing employees about hazards related to workplace chemicals.  The Hazard Communication standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) ensures that the hazards of all chemicals produced are evaluated, and that information concerning these hazards is transmitted to employers and employees. Under the provisions of this standard each employee exposed to hazardous chemicals must receive information about those chemicals through a comprehensive hazard communication program which includes identification of chemical hazards, chemical labeling, and material safety data sheets in the training program.

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