Hazard Communication-GHS

Hazard Communication - Globally Harmonized System$35.00 USD (Fee Waived Until Dec 1, 2013)Required Training for all personnel by December 1, 2013 HAZCOM-GHS establishes harmonized definitions of hazards for physical , health and environmental. Develops specific criteria for labels including pictograms, signal words and hazard  and precautionary statements and harmonizes the format for safety data sheets to the 16 sections ANSI  format.  The United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, third revision is sometimes called the “purple book” has been an initiative  since 1992 to provide a system for the standard handling of chemicals worldwide. The system used as reference several existing systems from various countries. It is now available for adoption by competent authorities around the world.  Revision 3 of the GHS was used by OSHA as the reference for the new Hazard Communication rule. About 32 million workers are potentially exposed to one or more chemical hazards. There are an estimated 575,000 existing chemical products, and hundreds of new ones being introduced each year. Exposure to chemicals poses a serious problem for many workers. Chemical exposure may cause or contribute to many serious health effects such as heart ailments, kidney and lung damage, sterility, cancer, burns, and rashes. Some chemicals may also be safety hazards and have the potential to cause fires and explosions and other serious accidents.  Because of the seriousness of these problems, and because many people know little or nothing about them, Congress passed The Right-To-Know law. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) subsequently developed the Hazard Communication standard to establish uniform requirements for informing employees about hazards related to workplace chemicals.  The Hazard Communication standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) ensures that the hazards of all chemicals produced are evaluated, and that information concerning thes
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$17.50

QUANTITY DISCOUNTS

1-10
$20.00
11-25 $18.00
26-50 $17.00
51-75 $16.00
76-100 $15.00
101-UP $10.00

Description

Hazard Communication - Globally Harmonized System

$35.00 USD (Fee Waived Until Dec 1, 2013)

 

Required Training for all personnel by December 1, 2013 HAZCOM-GHS establishes harmonized definitions of hazards for physical , health and environmental. Develops specific criteria for labels including pictograms, signal words and hazard  and precautionary statements and harmonizes the format for safety data sheets to the 16 sections ANSI  format.  The United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, third revision is sometimes called the “purple book” has been an initiative  since 1992 to provide a system for the standard handling of chemicals worldwide. The system used as reference several existing systems from various countries. It is now available for adoption by competent authorities around the world.  Revision 3 of the GHS was used by OSHA as the reference for the new Hazard Communication rule. 

About 32 million workers are potentially exposed to one or more chemical hazards. There are an estimated 575,000 existing chemical products, and hundreds of new ones being introduced each year. Exposure to chemicals poses a serious problem for many workers. Chemical exposure may cause or contribute to many serious health effects such as heart ailments, kidney and lung damage, sterility, cancer, burns, and rashes. Some chemicals may also be safety hazards and have the potential to cause fires and explosions and other serious accidents.  Because of the seriousness of these problems, and because many people know little or nothing about them, Congress passed The Right-To-Know law. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) subsequently developed the Hazard Communication standard to establish uniform requirements for informing employees about hazards related to workplace chemicals.  The Hazard Communication standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) ensures that the hazards of all chemicals produced are evaluated, and that information concerning these hazards is transmitted to employers and employees. Under the provisions of this standard each employee exposed to hazardous chemicals must receive information about those chemicals through a comprehensive hazard communication program which includes identification of chemical hazards, chemical labeling, and material safety data sheets in the training program.

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